Wambiana Cattle Station (45)

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Site name: Wambiana Cattle Station
Site number: 45
Point numbers: 177 (Wambiana Cattle Station Dry A), 178 (Wambiana Cattle Station Wet A), 179 (Wambiana Cattle Station Dry B), 180 (Wambiana Cattle Station Wet B)
Ecoregion: Tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas and shrublands
Participant and site owner: The Lyons family
Site location: Far North Queensland
Latitude: -20.554
Longitude: 146.111
Site description: Wambiana Cattle Station is a working cattle station, educational facility, and tourism operator. Wambiana Cattle Station hosts a long-term grazing trial and provides an outdoor laboratory for the research of native invertebrates and broader biodiversity across multiple ecosystems.

Spyglass Research Station (44)

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Site name: Spyglass Research Station
Site number: 44
Point numbers: 174 (Spyglass Dry A), 173 (Spyglass Wet A), 176 (Spyglass Dry B), 175 (Spyglass Wet B)
Ecoregion: Tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas and shrublands
Participant and site owner: James Cook University, Department of Agriculture and Fisheries
Site location: Far North Queensland
Latitude: -19.503
Longitude: 145.700
Site description: Cattle and scientific research station managed by DAF and JCU.

Uunguu Indigenous Protected Area (Wunambal Gaambera) (16)

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Site name: Uunguu Indigenous Protected Area (Wunambal Gaambera)
Site number: 16
Point numbers: 61 (Uunguu Indigenous Protected Area (Wunambal Gaambera) Dry A), 62 (Uunguu Indigenous Protected Area (Wunambal Gaambera) Wet A), 64 (Uuunguu Indigenous Protected Area (Wunambal Gaambera) Dry B), 63 (Uunguu Indigenous Protected Area (Wunambal Gaambera) Wet B)
Ecoregion: Tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas and shrublands
Participant and site owner: Bush Heritage Australia
Site location: Northern Western Australia
Latitude: -14.630
Longitude: 125.797
Site description: Large area run in partnership with traditional owners (Wunambal Gaambera Aboriginal Corporation). Open Woodland with adjacent Monsoon Vine Thicket. Existing mammal monitoring sites (including nest boxes) with vegetation plots with 5+years data established under the Landscape Conservation Initiative. Kimberley Sugar Gliders have been recorded from a group of these sites.

Chillagoe (42)

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Site name: Chillagoe
Site number: 42
Point numbers: 165 (Chillagoe Dry A), 166 (Chillagoe Wet A), 167 (Chillagoe Dry B), 168 (Chillagoe Wet B)
Ecoregion: Tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas and shrublands
Participant and site owner: Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service
Site location: Northern Queensland
Latitude: -17.198
Longitude: 144.504
Site description: Chillagoe lies within a belt of limestone approximately 5km wide and 45km long, extending from south of Chillagoe, north-west to the Walsh River and beyond. The vegetation of Chillagoe-Mungana Caves National Park is dominated by tropical woodland with isolated pockets of deciduous vine thicket. Bats and other taxa, including birds and reptiles, are found in Chillagoe’s caves.

Litchfield Savanna TERN SuperSite (52)

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Site name: Litchfield Savanna TERN SuperSite
Site number: 52
Point numbers: 205 (Litchfield Dry A), 206 (Litchfield Wet A), 207 (Litchfield Dry B), 208 (Litchfield Wet B)
Ecoregion: Tropical and subtropical grasslands, savannas and shrublands
Participant and site owner: Adelaide University, Australian Landscape Trust, Terrestrial Ecosystem Research Network
Site location: Northern Territory
Latitude: -13.170
Longitude: 130.790
Site description: The Litchfield Savanna SuperSite represents high rainfall, frequently burnt, tropical savanna. At 1.9 million square kilometres, tropical savanna is the dominant ecosystem type across northern Australia. Understanding biogeochemical cycles, impacts of fire on sequestration, vegetation and fauna is a national priority.

The Litchfield Savanna TERN SuperSite is a 5 km x 5 km block of relatively uniform open-forest savanna inside Litchfield National Park, and about 80 km south of Darwin. In the Northern Territory, savanna ecosystems are largely intact in terms of tree cover, with only modest levels of land use change. Despite this, there is evidence of a loss of biodiversity, most likely due to shifts in fire regimes and a loss of patchiness in the landscape. Approximately 40% of the savanna burn every year and understanding fire impacts on fauna and flora is essential for effective land management.